Some of the biggest dangers that learner drivers face on the road are lorries and commercial vehicles. Brake revealed that in 2013 there were over 6,000 crashes involving heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) in England and Wales, equal to 17 a day, which is a large number considering that they only make up 10% of all traffic. In this post we look at why lorries can be hazardous, driving tips that will you increase your safety when driving behind or next to lorries, and look at how a new mandate in the USA that will reduce the number of commercial vehicle accidents.

Keeping a Good Distance From Lorries

Commercial vehicles come with the potential hazard of objects falling off the vehicle. The Yorkshire Post reported that out of 41 lorries stopped by the West Yorkshire Police, 8 vehicles were charged for insecure loads. Car drivers aren’t aware that just by being in the same vicinity of a lorry could be potentially life ending. In the same report, Sergeant Steve Suggitt of the West Yorkshire Police’s Safer Roads and Neighbourhood Support Team paints a picture of what lorries could potentially mean to other vehicles: “At 30mph, a vehicle travels 100ft in 2.3 seconds—that’s equivalent to the length of a Boeing 737 aircraft. HGVs are potential killing machines.” In our post ‘How to Prevent Becoming a Car Accident Statistic’ we recommend that parents teach their children defensive driving. This means being aware of the vehicles around them by maintaining a large following distance and recognising potential escape routes. This is especially true of commercial vehicles.

Overtake Quickly but Safely

Driving beside a lorry is one the most dangerous positions a car can be in on the road. Country Living spoke to a commercial driver with many years experience who called the space right next to any lorry the “kill zone” and emphasised that it is the one space every driver should stay away from: “If the truck loses control or has to change lanes quickly, you’re going to get crushed because the truck has nowhere else to go.” When overtaking a lorry do it as quickly as possible, and if on a motorway don’t remain next to lorry.

U.S. ELD Ruling

According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, drowsy driving has caused up to 72,000 crashes, with 6,000 fatal crashes, annually in America. Additionally, the reports indicate that commercial drivers who manoeuvre tow trucks, tractor trailers, and other massive vehicles of the same category, are more susceptible to falling asleep behind the wheel.

To monitor safety and improve the trucking industry, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is enforcing a law that will require commercial transport vehicles to have Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs). These ELDs will not only implement a cloud-based monitoring system that will digitally-document every aspect of the journey, but they will also help supervise a driver’s workload. Fleetmatics points out that ELDs will be able to log the Hours of Service (HoS), which will prevent drivers from overdriving and therefore being unsafe on the road Fleet operators, road safety agencies, and truck drivers will have access to the data recorded by the ELDs, which helps all parties to recognise ways to better overall operations.

Unfortunately, in UK, a similar law has yet to be administered. Learner drivers need to be aware of the danger that lorries can present. Being aware of the potential danger is key to being safe on the road.

Exclusively written for lincsdrivingsolutions.uk
by RoadTalksWithJen

Lincs Driving Solutions, Lincoln